What is Speech Therapy?

The professionals who are educated to assess speech and language development and to treat speech and language disorders are called speech-language pathologists (sometimes informally referred to as speech therapists). Speech-language pathologists can also help people with swallowing disorders.

Does my child need Speech Therapy?

 

  • Doesn't Smile or Interact with Others (Birth-3M)
  • Doesn't Babble (4-7 Months)
  • Makes Few Sounds (7-12 Months)
  • Does Not Use Gestures (Ex: Waiving, Pointing) (7-12 Months)
  • Says Only a Few Words (12-18 Months)
  • Doesn't Put Words Together to Form Sentences (1 1/2 - 3 Years)
  • Has Trouble Playing and Talking with Other Children (2 - 3 Years)
  • Has Problems with Early Reading and Writing Skills (Ex: May Not Show Interest in Books or Drawing) (2 1/2 - 3 Years)

 

  • Says p, b, m, and h incorrectly (1 - 2 Years)
  • Says k, g, t, f, d, and n incorrectly (2 - 3 Years)
  • Produces Speech That is Unclear Even to Familiar People (2 - 3 Years)
  • Struggles to say sounds or words (2½–3 years)
  • Repeats first sounds of words—"b-b-b-ball" for "ball" (2½–3 years)
  • Pauses a lot while talking (2½–3 years)
  • Stretches sounds out—"f-f-f-f-farm" for "farm"(2½–3 years)

Learn About the Areas of Speech

 

Who benefits from Speech Therapy:

 

Diagnosis

Achalasia

Aphasia (amnestic, global, nominal, semantic, syntactic)

Agnosia

Ankloglossia

Attention Deficit Disorder

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Aphasia

Aphonia

Apraxia

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Bell's Palsy

Central Auditory Processing Disorder

Cerebral Palsy

Cleft Lip or Palate

Concussion

Chronic Ear Infections

Congenital Malformation of the Musculoskeletal System

Congenital Malformation of the Respiratory System

Congenital Malformation of the Nervous System

Cognitive Communication Deficit

Desease of Vocal Cords

Dentofacial Anomalies

Developmental Disorder of Speech and Language

Down Syndrome

Dysarthria

Dyslalia

Dysphasia

Dysphasia

Dyspnea

Dysphonia

Dyslexia

Expressive Language Disorder

Facial Weakness

Feeding Difficulties

Fluency Disorder

Frontal Lobe and Executive Function Deficit

GERD/GER

Hearing Loss

Hemiplegia (right or lefts side)

Hyper/Hyponasality

Idioglossia

Intellectual Disabilities

Jaw Asymetry

Lalling

Lisping

Macroglossia

Malocclusion

Mixed Receptive-Expressive Language Disorder

Muscular Dystrophy

Neurofibromatosis

Nodules of Vocal Cords

Paralysis of Vocal Cord and Larynx

Phonological Disorder

Polyp of Vocal Cord and Larynx

Speech and Language Delay Due to Hearing Loss

Slurred Speech

Symptoms and Signs Involving Speech and Voice

Swallowing Disorders

Tracheostomy

Traumatic Brain Injury 

Ventilator Dependence

Voice REsponance Disorders

Wernicke's

Zenker's Diverticulum


 

Difficulty

Attention 

Articulation

Augmentative Communication Device Training

Chewing

Communication

Coughing

Chronic Hoarseness

Delay in Words

Eye Contact

Gagging

Following Directions (preferred or non-preferred)

Food Refusal

Initiates and Carries out Conversation 

Intellectual thinking

Listening to Instructions

Limited Vocbulary

Literacy

Loudness of Voice

Matches Tone and Voice Level

Memory Concerns

Motor Planning

Organizing Environment 

Perception

Pre-Linguistics

Pragmatics

Problem Solving

Putting words together

Reading

Respritory Problems

Seeking Needed Verbal or Written Information

Self Regulation

Semantics

Sequencing Tasks 

Social Skills

Social Speech 

Sound Production

Sound Processing

Stuttering

Syntax

Swallowing / Eating Food or Fluid

Takes Turns

Vocal Hygiene

Voice Pitch, Volume, Quality

Weak Oral Motor Muscles